From Here To There

“WE nearly died in there. Doesn’t it make you think?”

Daniel Cotton (Philip Glenister) asks the question of his father Samuel (Bernard Hill) in From There To Here.

The three part BBC1 drama, written by Peter Bowker, opens with the June 1996 Manchester bomb which destroyed a large part of the city centre.

But this is not a story about the IRA attack. It charts the ripples of that initial trigger on two families across Greater Manchester and Cheshire.

Last night I attended a screening of episode one at BAFTA in London followed by a Q&A, including Phil and Pete.

You can read my full transcript below, edited very slightly to remove any major spoilers.

“IT’S the most full on thing I’ve ever done.”

Keeley Hawes speaking tonight about being “waterboarded” in the second series of Line Of Duty.

Not quite the infamous torture technique.

But struggling to breathe after having her hair grabbed and being violently flushed face down several times into a police HQ toilet.

“You just do it and then have a big glass of wine,” she smiled.

Philip Glenister on The Alan Titchmarsh Show earlier this week

“IT was absolutely misconstrued.

“I didn’t come up with the line at all. It was always their line.

“I’ve never claimed that it was my line in the past and I certainly wouldn’t in the future.”

Philip Glenister gave his side of the “Quattrow” story on BBC Radio 4’s Loose Ends programme tonight. (Saturday).

Claiming that an interview reference to a “jokey” discussion about the choice of iconic car Gene Hunt should drive in Ashes To Ashes resulted in a mix up.

Jim Broadbent (Sam) and John Simm (Tom)

“DON’T measure me against him. He’s won an Oscar,” smiles John Simm.

We’re sat in a conference room at BBC TV Centre in west London, where a few days before I’d also interviewed Jim Broadbent.

John and Jim co-star in superb new BBC1 drama Exile, to be screened over three consecutive nights from Sunday May 1.

Relaxed in a grey V-neck jumper, white T-shirt and blue jeans, an unshaven John was in good spirits during the small round table chat back in January.

Where the conversation ranged from Hamlet to Harry and Paul via Exile, Doctor Who and Sam Tyler.


IF The Railway Arms is Heaven, I’m staying away from lifts and taking the stairs from now on.

The emotional last ever episode of Ashes To Ashes appears to have had a powerful effect on the majority of the watching audience.

There have been lots of tears and sleepless nights as fans continue to digest the brilliance of those final 60 minutes.

So I’m guessing a few people may like to read the edited transcript of my interview with co-creator Matthew Graham, when he was able to talk freely for the first time about the Mars and Ashes Genieverse.


DIXON Of Dock Green provided the black and white postscript to the last ever episode of Ashes To Ashes.

“So it was all sorted out in the end. And no bones broken, luckily,” said a reassuring PC George Dixon.

It was, after all, only a TV show. But a very special one.

Time for supper and then up those stairs to bed.

A fitting farewell for a drama many obsessed over, with online fan forum The Railway Arms going into meltdown after each episode was screened.

The final emotional hour revealed almost all about DCI Gene Hunt and his world but left just enough ambiguity to keep those web servers humming for some time to come.

If you’ve yet to see the Ashes’ farewell, which finished a few minutes ago, do NOT read any further.

I spoke at length to Ashes co-creator Matthew Graham earlier this week – the first interview he had given where he was able to speak freely about the secrets of Gene’s world and those who found themselves drawn into it.

Keeping a promise he made to me just over three years ago when we conducted a similar interview for use after the final episode of Life On Mars.